Hanne Sickel

Research Scientist

(+47) 404 83 467
hanne.sickel@nibio.no

Place
Ås R9

Visiting address
Raveien 9, 1430 Ås

To document

Abstract

We present a methodology for distinguishing between three types of animal movement behavior (foraging, resting, and walking) based on high-frequency tracking data. For each animal we quantify an individual movement path. A movement path is a temporal sequence consisting of the steps through space taken by an animal. By selecting a set of appropriate movement parameters, we develop a method to assess movement behavioral states, reflected by changes in the movement parameters. The two fundamental tasks of our study are segmentation and clustering. By segmentation, we mean the partitioning of the trajectory into segments, which are homogeneous in terms of their movement parameters. By clustering, we mean grouping similar segments together according to their estimated movement parameters. The proposed method is evaluated using field observations (done by humans) of movement behavior. We found that on average, our method agreed with the observational data (ground truth) at a level of 80.75% ± 5.9% (SE).

To document

Abstract

Interest in localized agri-food systems has grown significantly in recent years. They are associated with several benefits and are seen as important for rural development. An important share of the academic debate addresses the contribution of localized food systems to the current and/or future sustainability of agriculture. Sustainability is defined in several ways, but many scholars recognize that sustainability can only be achieved by a combination of socio-economic, cultural, and environmental aspects. However, the attributes and indicators used for sustainability analyses also differ. Biodiversity is, for instance, often not included in analyses of environmental sustainability even if biodiversity is of crucial importance for longer-term ecological sustainability. To contribute to the debate about the importance of localized food production for sustainability from the environmental point of view, specifically with regard to biodiversity, this is therefore discussed based on the results of several studies presented in this paper. The studies focus on Nordic low-intensity livestock systems related to species-rich semi-natural grasslands. All the studies show that low-intensive agriculture and use of semi-natural grasslands may play an important role in maintaining biodiversity on both small and large scales. They also show that milk and dairy products from free-ranging livestock in heterogeneous landscapes with semi-natural grasslands may have a unique quality associated with local grazing resources. Thus, producers can combine production of food of documented high nutritional and gastronomic value with maintenance of biodiversity, i.e., localized agri-food production based on low-intensive agriculture systems and semi-natural grasslands may be a win-win recipe for both farmers and the society.

To document

Abstract

Dette kapittelet presenterer forslaget til fagsystem for vurdering av god økologisk tilstand og begrunner valgene som er tatt. Deltagere i undergruppe hav (Per Fauchald, Normann Whitaker Green, Eva Ramirez-Llodra, Sylvia Frantzen, Cecilie von Quillfeldt og Anne Kirstine Frie) har bidratt betydelig til å utvikle egenskapene som gir en normativ beskrivelse av god økologisk tilstand i kapittel 3.4 .

To document

Abstract

Mountain tourism depends intensively on the quality of the landscape. In recent years, the Norwegian Trekking Association has focused on local food products at their staffed lodges and it uses the slogan “eat the view.” Such a strategy raises the focus on the agricultural use of the land and the quality of the products. Several Norwegian studies were carried out to investigate the quality of different mountain products and connections with vegetation types and grazing behavior. The results show that milk and meat products from animals grazing on alpine rangelands have improved quality compared to “normal” products. A healthier fatty acid composition and a higher content of secondary plant metabolites were characteristic of mountain products. Furthermore, grazing is of the utmost importance for the maintenance of open mountain landscapes and the biodiversity that is dependent on such landscapes. Maintaining traditional grazing systems also secures the preservation of traditional ecological knowledge about utilizing natural resources. Mountain tourism experiences could be improved and enhanced by documenting and telling the unique story of these complex connections between mountain landscapes, biodiversity, agricultural traditions, and local food products.

Abstract

Terroir characteristics of local food products are sometimes a result of ecosystem services from special nature types as mountain semi-natural grasslands. Several environmental conditions such as climate, topography, location above sea level, geology and soil are important factors defining frames for different vegetation types and available fodder resources in mountain areas. In addition, cultural traditions and a great variety in human land use systems are important determinants for grassland biodiversity. Results from several Norwegian studies show that species rich mountain pastures improve local food quality.

Abstract

In this project plant and vegetation preferences of two Norwegian dairy cattle breeds with different selection history were studied. The Norwegian dairy breed Blacksided Trønder and Nordland Cattle (STN) has never been selected efficiently for higher milk production. The other breed, however, the Norwegian Red (NR), has mainly been selected for this. Two herds both consisting of STN and NR cows, were studied. To examine the animals\" plant preferences, faeces samples were collected and analysed for plant fragments. Vegetation maps were also used to find possible differences in grazing preferences. Breed differences with regard to recorded plant fragments in the faeces samples were significant for Nardus stricta, a species characteristic for nutrient poor but mostly species rich vegetation types in the studied areas, vegetation types of high importance for the biodiversity especially in one of the areas. STN had the highest share of Nardus stricta. Altogether the results of the study indicate that a higher producing cattle breed might prefer to graze more nutrient rich vegetation areas compared to a lower yielding cattle breed, when grazing less nutrient and base rich - but species rich grasslands.