Biography

My key qualifications: study the fate of pesticides in the environment; their degradation and transport in soil and water. Method development for sample extraction and analysis of bioactive compounds from plants and fungi. Quantitative analysis with HPLC, LC-MS/MS and screening with LC-HRMS-QExactive.

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Abstract

Limited knowledge and experimental data exist on pesticide leaching through partially frozen soil. The objective of this study was to better understand the complex processes of freezing and thawing and the effects these processes have on water flow and pesticide transport through soil. To achieve this we conducted a soil column irrigation experiment to quantify the transport of a non-reactive tracer and the herbicide MCPA in partially frozen soil. In total 40 intact topsoil and subsoil columns from two agricultural fields with contrasting soil types (silt and loam) in South-East Norway were used in this experiment. MCPA and bromide were applied on top of all columns. Half the columns were then frozen at −3 °C while the other half of the columns were stored at +4 °C. Columns were then subjected to repeated irrigation events at a rate of 5 mm artificial rainwater for 5 h at each event. Each irrigation was followed by 14-day periods of freezing or refrigeration. Percolate was collected and analysed for MCPA and bromide. The results show that nearly 100% more MCPA leached from frozen than unfrozen topsoil columns of Hov silt and Kroer loam soils. Leaching patterns of bromide and MCPA were very similar in frozen columns with high concentrations and clear peaks early in the irrigation process, and with lower concentrations leaching at later stages. Hardly any MCPA leached from unfrozen topsoil columns (0.4–0.5% of applied amount) and concentrations were very low. Bromide showed a different flow pattern indicating a more uniform advective-dispersive transport process in the unfrozen columns with higher con- centrations leaching but without clear concentration peaks. This study documents that pesticides can be pre- ferentially transported through soil macropores at relatively high concentrations in partially frozen soil. These findings indicate, that monitoring programs should include sampling during snow melt or early spring in areas were soil frost is common as this period could imply exposure peaks in groundwater or surface water.

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Abstract

Phosphorus (P) is an important element for crop productivity and is widely applied in fertilizers. Most P fertilizers applied to land are sorbed onto soil particles, so research on improving plant uptake of less easily available P is important. In the current study, we investigated the responses in root morphology and root-exuded organic acids (OAs) to low available P (1 mM P) and sufficient P (50 mM P) in barley, canola and micropropagated seedlings of potato— three important food crops with divergent root traits, using a hydroponic plant growth system.We hypothesized that the dicots canola and tuber-producing potato and the monocot barley would respond differently under various P availabilities. WinRHIZO and liquid chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry results suggested that under low P availability, canola developed longer roots and exhibited the fastest root exudation rate for citric acid. Barley showed a reduction in root length and root surface area and an increase in root-exudedmalic acid under low-P conditions. Potato exuded relativelysmall amounts of OAs under low P, while therewas a marked increase in root tips. Based on the results, we conclude that different crops show divergent morphological and physiological responses to low P availability, having evolved specific traits of root morphology and root exudation that enhance their P-uptake capacity under low-P conditions. These results could underpin future efforts to improve P uptake of the three crops that are of importance for future sustainable crop production.

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Abstract

The report presents the results from multi-year field studies of transport of the sulfonylurea herbicides tribenuron-methyl and amidosulfuron in a barley field in Norway. A method for sample preparation of water samples and LC-MS/MS analysis of 6 sulfonylurea herbicides tribenuron-methyl, amidosulfuron, metsulfuron-methyl, iodosulfuron-methyl, thifensulfuron-methyl, rimsulfuron) and 5 degradation products (INL5296, INA4098, AEF101630, IN70941, IN70942) is also described.

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Abstract

Organochlorine pollutants in the major fish species (pike Esox lucius, perch Perca fluviatilis, and roach Rutilus rutilus) of Lake Arungen, Norway, were investigated after an extensive removal of large pike in 2004. The organochlorine pollutants detected in fish liver samples in 2005 were dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDTs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and heptachlor epoxide (HCE). DDTs were the dominant among all analyzed OCs. Sigma PCB and HCB, detected in fish from two clearly distinct trophic levels (prey and predators), give an indication of biontagnification. All OC concentrations in female pike were significantly lower compared to males, which might be due to the removal of high concentrations of pollutants in roe during spawning. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Abstract

This is a final report for the project Norwegian Scenarios II, part two, that has been performed in collaboration between Bioforsk Plant Health and Plant Protection, The Norwegian University of Life Sciences and the Norwegian Food Safety Authority. The aim of the project was to establish Norwegian scenarios for the models PRZM and MACRO and to use them for approval of new pesticides.

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Abstract

Although the sulfonylurea herbicides have been used for many years worldwide, few field studies have been performed and little is known about the occurrence, fate and transport of sulfonylureas in the field. This report presents results from the first controlled field and laboratory-studies on the fate of sulfonylurea herbicides in Norway and a method for sample preparation and LC-MS/MS analysis of sulfonylurea herbicides in water samples is also presented.