Ingunn Øvsthus

Research Scientist

(+47) 482 07 250
ingunn.ovsthus@nibio.no

Place
Ullensvang

Visiting address
NIBIO Ullensvang, NO-5781 Lofthus

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Abstract

In organic plant production, nitrogen (N) availability is often a growth-limiting factor. Under such conditions, off-farm waste-derived nutrient resources may be an alternative to meet the N demand. In this study, we described a production method for a shrimp shell (SS) pellet Product and evaluated the N fertiliser effect and N recovery efficiency (NRE) in a controlled climate pot experiment with potatoes. The experiment was set up with low, medium and high N levels of SS pellets in comparison with a standard mineral fertiliser (MF) at 9°C, 15°C and 21°C. In a separate study, we examined the loss of N as N2O from SS pellets in comparison with SS powder in a 100 days incubation experiment. The results documented the possibility to formulate a fertiliser pellet product from SS, and that SS pellets were an effective N fertiliser in potato at all Growth temperatures. Nevertheless, a slightly slower development and lower tuber yields than for MF indicated a delayed N-availability from SS pellet fertiliser. NRE after use of MF was around 90%, and about 70% for the different levels of SS pellets. The incubation experiment showed a higher rate of available N for SS powder than for pellets (67% and 39%, respectively) after 100 days of incubation at constant humidity and temperature. This difference was attributed to a lower degree of dissolved materials and a higher rate of denitrification and N2O emissions for pellets than for powder, probably caused by differences in physical properties, occurrence of anoxic hotspots and higher microbial activity around and inside the SS pellets.

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Abstract

More sustainable production of high-quality, nutritious food is of worldwide interest. Increasing nutrient recycling into food systems is a step in this direction. The objective of the present study was to determine nitrogen (N) fertiliser effects of four waste-derived and organic materials in a cropping sequence of broccoli, potato and lettuce grown at two latitudes (58° and 67° N) in Norway during three years. Effects of anaerobically digested food waste (AD), shrimp shell (SS), algae meal (AM) and sheep manure (SM) at different N application rates (80 and 170 kg N ha–1 for broccoli, and 80 and 60 kg N ha–1 for potato and lettuce, respectively) and residual effects were tested on crop yield, N uptake, N recovery efficiency (NRE), N balance, N content in produce, mineral N in soil, product quality parameters and content of nitrate in lettuce. Mineral fertiliser (MF) served as control. Effects on yield, N uptake, NRE, N balance and product quality parameters could to a great extent be explained by estimated potentially plant-available N, which ranked in the order of AD>SS>SM>AM. Results for crops fertilised with AD and SS were not significantly different from MF at the same N application rate, while AM, in agreement with its negative effect on N mineralisation, gave negative or near-neutral effects compared to the control. No residual effect was detected after the year of application. The results showed that knowledge about N dynamics of relevant organic waste-derived fertilisers is necessary to decide on the timing and rate of application.

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Abstract

Organic vegetable production attempts to pursue multiple goals concerning influence on environment, production resources, and human health. In areas with limited availability of animal manure, there is a need for considering various off-farm nutrient resources for such production. Different organic and waste-derived fertilizer materials were used for broccoli production at two latitudes (58° and 67°) in Norway during two years. The fertilizer materials were applied at two rates of total N (80 and 170 kg ha–1) and compared with mineral fertilizer (170 kg ha–1) and no fertilizer. Broccoli yield was strongly influenced by fertilizer materials (algae meal < unfertilized control < sheep manure < extruded shrimp shell < anaerobically digested food waste < mineral fertilizer). Yield, but not glucosinolate content, was linearly correlated with estimated potentially plant-available N. However, extruded shrimp shell and mineral NPK fertilizer gave higher glucosinolate contents than sheep manure and no fertilizer. Sensory attributes were less affected by fertilizer material and plant-available N.