Nina Sæther

Head of Norwegian Genetic Resource Centre

(+47) 993 89 469
nina.sather@nibio.no

Place
Ås R9

Visiting address
Raveien 9, 1430 Ås

Biography

As director of Norwegian Genetic Resource Centre, I am working with genetic resources for food and agriculture within animal genetic resources, plant genetic resources and forest genetic resources. I did my PhD on animal genetic resources in 2009; "Differences in grazing preferences, behaviour and production efficiency between two cattle breeds." 

I started working with conservation of Norwegian endangered dairy cattle breeds in 1990 by traveling around in most of Norway recording each animal that was left and establishing a pedigree database for these breeds, Kuregisteret (The Cow Register). This database is still of essential value both in the breeding work for these breeds and when monitoring them. Since 2000 I have been national coordinator for animal genetic resources.

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate genetic diversity within and between lines at the Norwegian live poultry gene bank as well as assessing the conservation value in an international context. Eight lines including the national breed, Jærhøns, were genotyped with the 600K Affymetrix® Axiom® Chicken Genotyping Array. The white egg layers were generally more inbred than the brown layers. Comparative analyses were carried out with 72 international populations of different origins. The lines that were last bred for commercial production in Norway, Norbrid, are clearly separated from the rest of the international set and more closely related to the current commercial lines. The brown egg layer Norbrid 7 has the highest relative contribution to genetic diversity. The Norwegian genebank lines are of conservation value in a national and international perspective, as they all add genetic diversity to the global set.

To document

Abstract

The report is based on information Norway provided in an electronic questionnaire that was prepared by FAO to collect national data as a contribution to The State of the World’s Biodiversity for Food and Agriculture. The report presents information on the status and trends of biodiversity for food and agriculture, including animals, plants and micro-organisms with a direct or indirect role in agriculture, forestry and/or fisheries. A lot of data on these issues is available in Norway; however it is mostly spread across different monitoring systems and fragmented. The report draws attention to the use and conservation of biodiversity for food and agriculture and to the function(s) of and interactions between its components in production systems. The report focuses more on associated biodiversity, ecosystem services and wild foods than on plant, animal and forest genetic resources as these are presented in other reports. Even if the awareness on the importance of associated biodiversity to food production and food

To document

Abstract

Biodiversity underpins food security, ecosystem resilience, coping strategies for climate change, adequate nutritional requirements and the management of biological processes needed for sustainable agricultural production. To achieve sustainable food production and ensure environmental sustainability, agricultural, forest and marine production systems need to focus more on the effective conservation and management of biodiversity and ecosystem services. This requires a comprehensive understanding and enhanced use of the role of biodiversity, genetic resources and their ecosystem functions. Norway’s country report on the state of biological diversity for food and agriculture addresses these issues, and by doing so, also contributes to the preparation of FAO’s report on the state of the World’s Biodiversity for Food and Agriculture.

To document

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate genetic diversity within and between lines at the Norwegian live poultry gene bank as well as assessing the conservation value in an international context. Eight lines including the national breed, Jærhøns, were genotyped with the 600K Affymetrix® Axiom® Chicken Genotyping Array. The white egg layers were generally more inbred than the brown layers. Comparative analyses were carried out with 72 international populations of different origins. The lines that were last bred for commercial production in Norway, Norbrid, are clearly separated from the rest of the international set and more closely related to the current commercial lines. The brown egg layer Norbrid 7 has the highest relative contribution to genetic diversity. The Norwegian genebank lines are of conservation value in a national and international perspective, as they all add genetic diversity to the global set.

To document

Abstract

The report is based on information Norway provided in an electronic questionnaire that was prepared by FAO to collect national data as a contribution to The State of the World’s Biodiversity for Food and Agriculture. The report presents information on the status and trends of biodiversity for food and agriculture, including animals, plants and micro-organisms with a direct or indirect role in agriculture, forestry and/or fisheries. A lot of data on these issues is available in Norway; however it is mostly spread across different monitoring systems and fragmented. The report draws attention to the use and conservation of biodiversity for food and agriculture and to the function(s) of and interactions between its components in production systems. The report focuses more on associated biodiversity, ecosystem services and wild foods than on plant, animal and forest genetic resources as these are presented in other reports. Even if the awareness on the importance of associated biodiversity to food production and food

To document

Abstract

Biodiversity underpins food security, ecosystem resilience, coping strategies for climate change, adequate nutritional requirements and the management of biological processes needed for sustainable agricultural production. To achieve sustainable food production and ensure environmental sustainability, agricultural, forest and marine production systems need to focus more on the effective conservation and management of biodiversity and ecosystem services. This requires a comprehensive understanding and enhanced use of the role of biodiversity, genetic resources and their ecosystem functions. Norway’s country report on the state of biological diversity for food and agriculture addresses these issues, and by doing so, also contributes to the preparation of FAO’s report on the state of the World’s Biodiversity for Food and Agriculture.