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Abstract

The aim of this study was to contribute to the development of pelleted compound recycling fertilizerswith favourable handling and spreading characteristics and balanced nutrient ratios by combiningnitrogen (N)- and phosphorus (P)-rich waste resources (meat bone meal, fish sludge or food waste)with potassium (K)-rich bottom wood ash. Pelleted compound recycling fertilizers with gooddurability and low dusting tendency were produced by roll-pelleting preheated waste resources at asuitable moisture content. However, the nutrient ratios in the final products were insufficientlybalanced, with too low N concentrations relative to P and K to meet crop demands. In a bioassayusing barley ( Hordeum vulgare) and a nutrient-deficient sand/peat mixture, the relative agronomiceffectiveness (RAE) of pelleted compound recycling fertilizers and reference recycling fertilizers was22–42% of that of mineral compound fertilizer. Growth limitation was due to reduced N availability(mineral fertilizer equivalent - MFE = 35–57%) or reduced P availability (MFE = 20–115%), with thegreatest P fertilizer value obtained for digestate based on dairy manure and fish sludge. Availability ofK in bottom wood ash was masked by the experimental soil.

Abstract

Application of fish sludge as fertiliser to agricultural land can contribute to closing nutrient cycles in fish farming. The effect of different treatment technologies on the nitrogen fertilisation effects of fish sludge was studied by a bioassay with barley (Hordeum vulgare), an incubation and a field experiment. Dried fish sludge resulted in relative agronomic efficiency of 50–80% compared with mineral fertiliser. The anaerobic digestate based on fish sludge (20 vol%) and dairy manure did not increase nitrogen uptake in barley. Increasing the ratio of fish sludge in the digestate increased the fertilisation effect, but requires optimisation of the biogas process. A simple logistics analysis conducted for a case hatchery showed that on-site drying and co-digestion of fish sludge in a central biogas plant can be regarded as equal in terms of costs. Norway can become an exporter of fish sludge-based recycling fertilisers if current regulations are modified to facilitate nutrient recycling.

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Abstract

Minable rock phosphate is a finite resource. Replacing mineral phosphorus (P) fertilizer with P-rich secondary resources is one way to manage P more efficiently, but the importance of physicochemical and microbial soil processes induced by secondary resources for plant P uptake is still poorly understood. Using radioactive-labeling techniques, the fertilization effects of dairy manure, fish sludge, meat bone meal, and wood ash were studied as P uptake by barley after 44 days and compared with those of water-soluble mineral P (MinP) and an unfertilized control (NoP) in a pot experiment with an agricultural soil containing little available P at two soil pH levels, approximately pH 5.3 (unlimed soil) and pH 6.2 (limed soil). In a parallel incubation experiment, the effects of the secondary resources on physicochemical and microbial soil processes were studied. The results showed that the relative agronomic efficiency compared with MinP decreased in the order: manure ≥fish sludge ≥wood ash ≥meat bone meal. The solubility of inorganic P in secondary resources was the main driver for P uptake by barley (Hordeum vulgare). The effects of secondary resources on physicochemical and microbial soil processes were of little overall importance. Application of organic carbon with manure resulted in microbial P immobilization and decreased uptake by barley of P derived from the soil. On both soils, P uptake by barley was best explained by a positive linear relationship with the H2O + NaHCO3-soluble inorganic P fraction in fertilizers or by a linear negative relationship with the HCl-soluble inorganic P fraction in fertilizers.

Abstract

This study examined the P fertilization effects of 11 sewage sludges obtained from sewage treated with Al and/or Fe salts to remove P by a pot experiment with ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and a nutrient-deficient sand−peat mixture. Also it investigated whether fertilization effects could be predicted by chemical sludge characteristics and/or by P extraction. The mineral fertilizer equivalent (MFE) value varied significantly but was low for all sludges. MFE was best predicted by a negative correlation with ox-Al and ox-Fe in sludge, or by a positive correlation with P extracted with 2% citric acid. Ox-Al had a greater negative impact on MFE than ox-Fe, indicating that Fe salts are preferable as a coagulant when aiming to increase the plant availability of P in sludge. The results also indicate that sludge liming after chemical wastewater treatment with Al and/or Fe salts increases the P fertilization effect.

Abstract

Mineable rock phosphate is a limited resource. Replacing mineral phosphorus (P) fertiliser with P-rich secondary resources is one way to manage P more efficiently. The Norwegian potential to replace mineral P fertiliser with total P in secondary resources was analysed here using substance flow analysis. The results obtained were integrated with data on P plant-availability in secondary resources and showed that, theoretically, plant-available P in manure alone could fulfil the Norwegian demand for P fertiliser. However, P in manure is inefficiently utilised due to the geographical segregation of animal husbandry and arable farming, which contributes to considerable P over-application to agricultural soil. In Norway, agriculture and aquaculture drive P consumption and losses at similar levels, and the amount of P in fish excrement and feed losses from off-shore aquaculture pens (fish sludge) is of the same order of magnitude as P in manure. Fish sludge is currently not collected or utilised, but lost to coastal marine waters. All other secondary resources represent relatively small amounts of P, but may still be important regionally. Political incentives are thus needed in current regulations to efficiently close P cycles. To achieve P recycling in practice, it is essential to know the relative agronomic efficiency (RAE) of secondary P products compared with mineral fertiliser. Nine secondary P products were analysed here: Two biomass ashes, meat bone meal, fish sludge, catering waste, two food waste-based digestate products, dairy manure and chicken manure. The RAE of these secondary products studied in a bioassay with ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) varied widely, partly depending on soil pH. Fertilisation effects were mainly attributable to the solubility of the inorganic P species contained in the secondary products. Combining sequential chemical fractionation and non-destructive speciation methods revealed that P was mainly present as calcium phosphates of differing solubility. Further analysis showed that microbial and physicochemical soil processes induced by the secondary P products studied were of little overall importance for total P uptake in barley (Hordeum vulgare). Based on the results obtained, two chemical extraction methods for predicting the RAE of secondary products with unknown fertilisation effects are suggested: At soil pH <6.5, RAE should be predicted by the fraction of inorganic P in the secondary product (% of total P) that is extractable in H2O. At soil pH >6.5, RAE should be predicted by the fraction of inorganic P (% of total P) that is extractable in 0.5 M NaHCO3 (Olsen P).

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Abstract

N-rich waste resources have potentially good effects if applied as fertiliser to spring cereals. P fertilisation effects of meat and bone meal are strongly determined by soil pH, whereas P in bottom wood ash seems to have almost the same availability as easily soluble P in mineral fertilisers. K fertilisation effects were hidden by the soils ability to provide plants with plant available K.